WATER QUALITY REPORT – 2022

 

Royal Oaks Mobile Home Park – PWSID 3480044

 

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.  (This report contains very important information about your drinking water.  Translate it or speak with someone who understands it.)

 

 

This report has been prepared and distributed as required by the Safe Water Drinking Act.  It is intended to inform and assure consumers about the quality of their drinking water.

 

Last year, we conducted more than 350 tests for several drinking water contaminants and found no levels that exceeded the guidelines established by the Pennsylvania Department of

Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).  This report summarizes the quality of water we provided last year.  Included are details about the sources of water, what it contains, and how it compares to PADEP standards.  For more information about your water, please contact Kenneth L. Fulford at (610) 216-0150.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Our water comes from a well that is located in the park.  The park owns the land surrounding the wells and restricts any activity that could contaminate them.  The water is pumped out of the well and disinfected to protect you against microbial contaminants.  The water is then pumped into large storage tanks to assure that there is an ample supply at all times.  From the storage tanks, the water is pumped into the distribution system for your use.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

 

More information about contaminants can be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at  800-426-4791.

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:

 

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

 

  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can occur naturally or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

 

  • Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agricultural and residential uses.

 

  • Radioactive Contaminants, which are naturally occurring.

 

  • Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the concentration of certain contaminants provided by public water systems.  We treat our water according to these EPA regulations.  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

 

                                       WATER QUALITY DATA

 

Royal Oaks Mobile Home Park

 

The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2022 calendar year.  The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2022.  PADEP requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year, because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  Some of the data, therefore, may be more than one year old, but is representative of the water quality.

 

Terms and abbreviations used below:

 

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MLCG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  An MLCG allows for a margin of safety.
  • nd: not detected at testing limit
  • n/a: not applicable
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  An MCL is set as close to the respective MLCG as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.    
  • ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter   –  ppm:   parts per million or milligrams per liter       pCi/L:  picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected health risks. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Chemical

Contaminants

MCL MCLG Highest

Level

Detected

 Detection Range Sample Date Units Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant
Combined Uranium     20           0             1.63 n/a 01/02/19 pCi/L                   NO                    erosion of natural deposits
Trihalomethanes     80         n/a           21.9 n/a 07/19/22     ppb                 NO                        disinfection byproduct
Haloacetic Acids (5)     60              n/a 4.1 n/a 07/19/22     ppb     NO       disinfection byproduct
Lead and Copper AL MCLG 90th

Percentile Value

  Units # sites found above the AL Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead                                15      0              1.5                ppb          0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Copper                             1.3 1.3             0.112              ppm         0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Chlorine Residual, ppm MRDL MRDLG Minimum Required Detection  Range Date Low Value Month High Value Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Distribution, 2022                           4           4             n/a        0.83-1.08         n/a               FEB                NO                 used to control microbes

Entry Point, 2022                           4           4            0.40       0.60-1.82     10/19/22            n/a                 NO                 used to control microbes

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

All bacteria samples during 2022 were negative for E. coliDue to an administrative oversight, we failed to run a nitrate analysis.  A Tier 3 Public Notice is attached to this report.  The associated nitrite analysis was performed, but the lab reported it late. This did not affect the quality of your drinking water, but as a customer of the water system you have the right to know this.  There were no other violations in 2022.

 

 

 

3930-FM-BSDW0196b    7/2020                                 COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

Form                                                                DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

                              BUREAU OF SAFE DRINKING WATER

TIER 3 PUBLIC NOTICE

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER FAILURE TO MONITOR

 

ESTE INFORME CONTIENE INFORMACIÓN IMPORTANTE ACERCA DE SU AGUA POTABLE.  HAGA QUE ALGUIEN LO TRADUZCA PARA USTED, O HABLE CON ALGUIEN QUE LO ENTIENDA.

 

                                         Monitoring Requirements Not Met for Royal Oaks MHP                           

 

Our water system violated several drinking water standards over the past year.  Even though these were not emergencies, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened and what we did to correct these situations.

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis.  Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not our drinking water meets health standards.  During 2022 we failed to monitor for the following contaminants and therefore cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during that time.

 

What should I do?

There is nothing you need to do at this time.

The table below lists the contaminant(s) we did not properly test for during the last year, the required sampling frequency, how many samples we took, when samples should have been taken, and the date on which corrective action samples were (or will be) taken.

Contaminant Required sampling frequency Number of samples taken When all samples should have been taken When samples were or will be taken
Nitrate Annual 0 12/31/2022 05/23/2023
         

 

What happened?  What was done? When will it be resolved?

Due to a laboratory administrative error (violation #07758), the sample collected on 07/19/22 was successfully analyzed for nitrite but not nitrate.          .

 

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).  You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

For more information regarding this notice, please contact Kenneth L.  Fulford at (610) 216-0150        .

Certified by:

 

Signature:                                                                                                                                    Date: 05/15/23                 

 

Print Name and Title:  Kenneth L. Fulford – Operator, General Manager, K. L. Fulford Associates, Inc.                          

 

As a representative of the Public Water system indicated above, I certify that public notification addressing the above violation was distributed to all customers in accordance with the delivery requirements outlined in Chapter 25 PA Code 109 Subchapter D of the Department of Environmental

Protection (DEP’s) regulations.  The following methods of distribution were used: Notice Distributed with Consumer Confidence Report

 

PWS ID#:  3480044                                                                                                                                                Date distributed:                             

 

 

PWSID # NJ0805002 

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Malaga Mobile Home Park

For the Year 2023, Results from the Year 2022

 

We are pleased to present to you this year’s Annual Drinking Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.

 

If you are a landlord, you must distribute this Drinking Water Quality Report to every tenant as soon as practicable, but no later than three business days after receipt. Delivery must be done by hand, mail, or email, and by posting the information in a prominent location at the entrance of each rental premises, pursuant to section #3 of NJ P.L. 2021, c.82 (C.58:12A-12.4 et seq.).

 

We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is wells.  Our wells draw groundwater from the Kirkwood Cohansey Aquifer. Our wells are 137 feet deep, and are located on lots 3a and 24 off of the office road.  The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) has completed and issued the Source Water Assessment Report and Summary for this public water system, which is available at WWW.state.nj.us/dep/swap or by contacting NJDEP’s Bureau of Safe Drinking Water at (609) 292-5550.  This water system’s source water susceptibility ratings and a list of potential contaminant sources is included.  We have a source water protection plan available for review at our office that provides more information such as sources of contamination.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

               

                                  TEST RESULTS       
Contaminant

 

Violati on

Y/N

Level 

Detected

 

Units of

Measurem                 ent

MC LG

 

MCL

 

Likely Source of

Contamination

 

Inorganic Contaminants:        
Barium

Test results Yr. 2021

 

N

 

0.07

 

ppm

 

2

 

2

 

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits
Copper

Test results Yr. 2022

Result at the 90No th Percentile

N

 

0.24

No samples exceeded the action level.

ppm

 

1.3

 

AL=1.3

 

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Lead

Test results Yr. 2022

Result at the 90 th Percentile

N

 

 5.4

No samples exceeded the action level.

ppb

 

0

 

AL=15

 

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits
Nickel

Test results Yr. 2021

N

 

1.1

 

ppb

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Nitrate (as Nitrogen)

Test results Yr. 2022

 

N 3.89 ppm 10 10 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits
Radioactive Contaminants:        
Gross Alpha

T est results Yr. 2021

N

 

6.5

 

pCi/1

 

0

 

15

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Combined Radium

228 & 226

Test results Yr. 20   21

N 3.0

 

pCi/1 0

 

5 Erosion of natural deposits

 

Regulated Disinfectants:            Level Detected

 

MRDL     MRDLG
Chlorine

Test results Yr. 2022

  Range = ND – 0.7 ppm Average = 0.3 ppm 4.0 ppm     4.0 ppm

Chlorine: Water additive used to control microbes.

 

We are pleased to report that our drinking water meets all federal and state safety requirements.  The table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2022.  The state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

 

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your drinking water, please call 856-885-3748.   We do not have regular scheduled meetings.

 

 

Nitrate: in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask advice from your health care provider.

 

 

 

Sources of Lead in Drinking Water

Malaga Mobile Home Park is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  Although most lead exposure occurs from inhaling dust or from contaminated soil, or when children eat paint chips, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) estimates that 10 to 20 percent of human exposure to lead may come from lead in drinking water. Infants who consume mostly mixed formula can receive 40 percent to 60 percent of their exposure to lead from drinking water. Lead is rarely found in the source of your drinking water but enters tap water through corrosion, or wearing away, of materials containing lead in the water distribution system and household plumbing materials. These materials include lead-based solder used to join copper pipes, brass, and chromebrass faucets, and in some cases, service lines made of or lined with lead.  New brass faucets, fittings, and valves, including those advertised as “lead-free”, may still contain a small percentage of lead, and contribute lead to drinking water. The law currently allows end-use brass fixtures, such as faucets, with up to 0.25 percent lead to be labeled as “lead free”. However, prior to January 4, 2014, “lead free” allowed up to 8 percent lead content of the wetted surfaces of plumbing products including those labeled National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) certified. Visit the NSF website at www.nsf.org to learn more about lead-containing plumbing fixtures. Consumers should be aware of this when choosing fixtures and take appropriate precautions. When water stands in lead service lines, lead pipes, or plumbing systems containing lead for several hours or more, the lead may dissolve into your drinking water. This means the first water drawn from the tap in the morning, or later in the afternoon if the water has not been used all day, can contain fairly high levels of lead.  Please call 856-885-3748 to find out how to get your water tested for lead. Testing is essential because you cannot see, taste, or smell lead in drinking water.

 

Health Effects of Lead

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development. Contact your local health department or healthcare provider to find out how you can get your child tested for lead if you are concerned about lead exposure. You can find out more about how to get your child tested and how to pay for it at https://www.state.nj.us/health/childhoodlead/testing.shtml.

 

In July 2021, P.L.2021, Ch.183 (Law) was enacted, requiring all community water systems to replace lead service lines in their service area within 10 years. Under the law, Malaga Mobile Home Park is required to notify its residents if they are served by a lead service line*. Our service line inventory is available upon request.

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas projection, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can, also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

 

DEFINITIONS

In the “Test Results” table you may find some terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we’ve provided the following definitions:

Non-Detects (ND) – laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Action Level – the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Maximum Contaminant Level – The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal -The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG)The level of a drinking water disinfectant, below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination

To ensure the continued quality of our water we treat it is several ways. We use Sodium-Hypochloride for disinfection, Caustic soda for Ph adjustment, and Klenphos for sequestrating of Iron.

 

The Safe Drinking Water Act regulations allow monitoring waivers to reduce or eliminate the monitoring requirements for asbestos, volatile organic chemicals and synthetic organic chemicals. Our system received monitoring waivers for asbestos and synthetic organic chemicals.

 

Special Notice:

In July 2022; an Updated Drinking Water Service Line Inventory, a Lead Service Line Replacement Plan and an Annual Lead Service Line Replacement Progress Report was to be submitted to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP).  We were inadvertently late in submitting our Lead Service Line Replacement Plan and our Annual Lead Service Line Replacement Progress Report and received reporting violations.  Once this information was received by NJDEP, the violation was returned to compliance on 1/11/2023.

 

 

 

Malaga Mobile Home Park – PWSID # NJ0805002

Malaga Mobile Home Park is a public community water system consisting of 2 active wells.

This system’s source water comes from the following aquifer: Kirkwood-Cohansey Watertable Aquifer System.

Susceptibility Ratings for Malaga Mobile Home Park Sources

The table below illustrates the susceptibility ratings for the seven contaminant categories (and radon) for each source in the system.  The table provides the number of wells and intakes that rated high (H), medium (M), or low (L) for each contaminant category.  For susceptibility ratings of purchased water, refer to the specific water system’s source water assessment report.

The seven contaminant categories are defined at the bottom of this page.  DEP considered all surface water highly susceptible to pathogens, therefore all intakes received a high rating for the pathogen category.  For the purpose of Source Water Assessment Program, radionuclides are more of a concern for ground water than surface water.  As a result, surface water intakes’ susceptibility to radionuclides was not determined and they all received a low rating.

If a system is rated highly susceptible for a contaminant category, it does not mean a customer is or will be consuming contaminated drinking water.  The rating reflects the potential for contamination of source water, not the existence of contamination. Public water systems are required to monitor for regulated contaminants and to install treatment if any contaminants are detected at frequencies and concentrations above allowable levels.  As a result of the assessments, DEP may customize (change existing) monitoring schedules based on the susceptibility ratings.

 

  Pathogens Nutrients Pesticides Volatile

Organic

Compounds

Inorganics Radionuclides   Radon Disinfection

Byproduct

Precursors

Sources H M L H M L H M L H M L H M L H M L H M L H M L
Wells – 2     2 2       2       2     2 2       2   2    

Pathogens: Disease-causing organisms such as bacteria and viruses.  Common sources are animal and human fecal wastes.

Nutrients: Compounds, minerals and elements that aid growth, that are both naturally occurring and man-made.  Examples include nitrogen and phosphorus.

Volatile Organic Compounds: Man-made chemicals used as solvents, degreasers, and gasoline components.  Examples include benzene, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and vinyl chloride.

Pesticides: Man-made chemicals used to control pests, weeds and fungus.  Common sources include land application and manufacturing centers of pesticides.  Examples include herbicides such as atrazine, and insecticides such as chlordane.

Inorganics: Mineral-based compounds that are both naturally occurring and man-made.  Examples include arsenic, asbestos, copper, lead, and nitrate.

Radionuclides: Radioactive substances that are both naturally occurring and man-made.  Examples include radium and uranium. Radon: Colorless, odorless, cancer-causing gas that occurs naturally in the environment.  For more information go to http://www.nj.gov/dep/rpp/radon/index.htm or call (800) 648-0394.

Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: A common source is naturally occurring organic matter in surface water.  Disinfection byproducts are formed when the disinfectants (usually chlorine) used to kill pathogens react with dissolved organic material (for example leaves) present in surface water.

 

We at Malaga Mobile Home Park work hard to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our residents help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future. Please call our office if you have questions.

 

                        WATER QUALITY REPORT – 2022

 

Lynwood Acres Mobile Home Park – PWSID 2450084

 

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.  (This report contains very important information about your drinking water.  Translate it or speak with someone who understands it.)

 

 

This report has been prepared and distributed as required by the Safe Water Drinking Act.  It is intended to inform and assure consumers about the quality of their drinking water.

 

Last year, we conducted more than 350 tests for several drinking water contaminants and found no levels that exceeded the guidelines established by the Pennsylvania Department of

Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).  This report summarizes the quality of water we provided last year.  Included are details about the sources of water, what it contains, and how it compares to PADEP standards.  For more information about your water, please contact Kenneth L. Fulford at (610) 216-0150.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Our water comes from a well that is located in the park.  The park owns the land surrounding the well and restricts any activity that could contaminate it.  The water is pumped out of the well and disinfected to protect you against microbial contaminants.  The water is then pumped into a large storage tank to assure that there is an ample supply at all times.  From the storage tanks, the water is pumped into the distribution system for your use.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

 

More information about contaminants can be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at  800-426-4791.

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:

 

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

 

  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, can occur naturally or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

 

  • Pesticides and Herbicides may come from a variety of sources such as agricultural and residential uses.

 

  • Radioactive Contaminants, which are naturally occurring.

 

  • Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants provided by public water systems.  We treat our water according to these EPA regulations.  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

 

                                       WATER QUALITY DATA

 

Lynwood Acres Mobile Home Park

 

 

The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2022 calendar year.  The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2022.  PADEP requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year, because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  Some of the data, therefore, may be more than one year old, but is representative of the water quality.

 

Terms and abbreviations used below:

 

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MLCG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  An MLCG allows for a margin of safety.        nd:   not detected at testing limit    n/a:   not applicable
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  An MCL is set as close to the respective MLCG as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.     ppb:   parts per billion or micrograms per liter  
  • ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter    pCi/L:  picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. HAL: Health Advisory Limit
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected health risks. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Chemical

Contaminants

MCL MCLG Highest

Level

Detected

 Detection Range Sample Date Units Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant
Trihalomethanes 80     n/a            2.7 n/a 07/06/21 ppb NO disinfection byproduct
Radium 228 5 0 1.18 0.00-1.18 12/29/22 pCi/L NO erosion of natural deposits
Barium 2       2           0.0223 n/a 09/07/21 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Antimony 6       6             0.54 n/a 09/07/21 ppb NO erosion of natural deposits
Nickel n/a      n/a          0.001 n/a 09/07/21 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Lead and Copper AL MCLG 90th

Percentile Value

Units # sites found above the AL Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead                                15      0              0.0                ppb          0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Copper                             1.3 1.3             0.037              ppm         0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Chlorine Residual, ppm MRDL MRDLG Minimum

 

Required

Detection  Range Date Low Value Month High Value Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Distribution, 2022                           4           4            0.15       1.00-1.54         n/a               JAN                NO                 used to control microbes

Entry Point, 2022                           4           4            0.40       0.70-2.10     03/15/22            n/a                 NO                 used to control microbes

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

There were no positive E. coli samples in 2022.  We had two late reports for distribution chlorine in 2022., Violation ID 14989 and 17299  This did not affect the quality of your water, but as a customer of the system, you have the right to know this.  The system has achieved compliance for all violations since 2019.

                        WATER QUALITY REPORT – 2022

 

Gap View Mobile Home Park – PWSID 3480072

 

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.  (This report contains very important information about your drinking water.  Translate it or speak with someone who understands it.)

 

 

This report has been prepared and distributed as required by the Safe Water Drinking Act.  It is intended to inform and assure consumers about the quality of their drinking water.

 

Last year, we conducted more than 350 tests for several drinking water contaminants and found no levels that exceeded the guidelines established by the Pennsylvania Department of

Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).  This report summarizes the quality of water we provided last year.  Included are details about the sources of water, what it contains, and how it compares to PADEP standards.  For more information about your water, please contact Kenneth L. Fulford at (610) 216-0150.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Our water comes from three (3) wells that are located in the park.  The park owns the land surrounding the wells and restricts any activity that could contaminate them.  The water is pumped out of the wells and disinfected to protect you against microbial contaminants.  The water is then pumped into three (3) large storage tanks to assure that there is an ample supply at all times.  From the storage tanks, the water is pumped into the distribution system for your use.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

 

More information about contaminants can be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at  800-426-4791.

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:

 

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

 

  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can occur naturally or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

 

  • Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agricultural and residential uses.

 

  • Radioactive Contaminants, which are naturally occurring.

 

  • Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants provided by public water systems.  We treat our water according to these EPA regulations.  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

 

                                       WATER QUALITY DATA

 

Gap View Mobile Home Park

 

 

The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2022 calendar year.  The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2022.  PADEP requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year, because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  Some of the data, therefore, may be more than one year old, but is representative of the water quality.

 

Terms and abbreviations used below:

 

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MLCG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  An MLCG allows for a margin of safety.        nd:   not detected at testing limit    n/a:   not applicable
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  An MCL is set as close to the respective MLCG as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.     ppb:   parts per billion or micrograms per liter  
  • ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter    pCi/L:  picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. HAL: Health Advisory Limit
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected health risks. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Chemical

Contaminants

MCL MCLG Highest

Level

Detected

 Detection Range Sample Date Units Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant
Radium 226 5       0             1.02 n/a 12/28/22 pCi/L NO disinfection byproduct
Barium 2       2            0.041 n/a 12/18/21 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Cyanide 200     200             9 n/a 12/18/21 ppb NO discharge from mills and factories
Nickel n/a     n/a          0.003 n/a 12/18/21 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Manganese HAL= 0.300           0.168 n/a 01/02/20 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Lead and Copper AL MCLG 90th

Percentile Value

Units # sites found above the AL Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead                                15      0              0.5                ppb          0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Copper                             1.3 1.3             0.190              ppm         0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Chlorine Residual, ppm MRDL MRDLG Minimum

 

Required

Detection  Range Date Low Value Month High Value Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Distribution, 2022                           4           4             n/a        0.84-1.35         n/a               AUG                NO                 used to control microbes

Entry Point, 2022                           4           4            0.50       0.57-1.95     07/08/22            n/a                 NO                 used to control microbes

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

There were no positive E. coli samples in 2022.  We had two late reporting violations 2022 for Dioxin.  The reports were late because the certified lab subcontracted the analysis to a lab in Minnesota and they were not familiar with the Pennsylvania reporting requirements.  There were no other violations in 2022.

                        WATER QUALITY REPORT – 2022

 

Freemansburg Mobile Home Park – PWSID 3480012

 

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua de beber.  Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.  (This report contains very important information about your drinking water.  Translate it or speak with someone who understands it.)

 

 

This report has been prepared and distributed as required by the Safe Water Drinking Act.  It is intended to inform and assure consumers about the quality of their drinking water.

 

Last year, we conducted more than 350 tests for several drinking water contaminants and found no levels that exceeded the guidelines established by the Pennsylvania Department of

Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).  This report summarizes the quality of water we provided last year.  Included are details about the sources of water, what it contains, and how it compares to PADEP standards.  For more information about your water, please contact Kenneth L. Fulford at (610) 216-0150.

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised individuals such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

Our water comes from a well that is located in the park.  The park owns the land surrounding the wells and restricts any activity that could contaminate them.  The water is pumped out of the well and disinfected to protect you against microbial contaminants.  The water is then pumped into large storage tanks to assure that there is an ample supply at all times.  From the storage tanks, the water is pumped into the distribution system for your use.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.

 

More information about contaminants can be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at  800-426-4791.

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:

 

  • Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

 

  • Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can occur naturally or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

 

  • Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agricultural and residential uses.

 

  • Radioactive Contaminants, which are naturally occurring.

 

  • Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the concentration of certain contaminants provided by public water systems.  We treat our water according to these EPA regulations.  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

 

                                       WATER QUALITY DATA

 

Freemansburg Mobile Home Park

 

The table below lists all the drinking water contaminants that we detected during the 2022 calendar year.  The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2022.  PADEP requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year, because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  Some of the data, therefore, may be more than one year old, but is representative of the water quality.

 

Terms and abbreviations used below:

 

  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MLCG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  An MLCG allows for a margin of safety.
  • nd: not detected at testing limit
  • n/a: not applicable
  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  An MCL is set as close to the respective MLCG as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
  • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.    
  • ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter   –  ppm:   parts per million or milligrams per liter       pCi/L:  picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected health risks. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Chemical

Contaminants

MCL MCLG Highest

Level

Detected

 Detection Range Sample Date Units Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant
Nitrate 10 10 3.49 n/a 06/14/22 ppm NO fertilizer runoff, septic tank leachate
Chromium 100 100 1 n/a 12/19/21 ppb NO erosion of natural deposits
Barium 2 2 0.037 n/a 12/19/21 ppm NO erosion of natural deposits
Trihalomethanes 80 n/a 7.5 n/a 08/04/22 ppb NO disinfection byproduct
Lead and Copper AL MCLG 90th

Percentile Value

Units # sites found above the AL Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead                                15      0              1.5                ppb          0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Copper                             1.3 1.3            0.0015             ppm         0 of 5 sites above AL            NO              corrosion of household plumbing systems

Chlorine Residual, ppm MRDL MRDLG Minimum Required Detection  Range Date Low Value Month High Value Violation Y/N Typical Source of Contaminant

Distribution, 2022                           4           4             n/a        0.77-1.80         n/a               AUG                NO                 used to control microbes

Entry Point, 2022                           4           4            0.40       0.58-2.20     12/19/22            n/a                 NO                 used to control microbes

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  We are responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

All bacteria samples during 2022 were negative for E. coliWe failed to record a distribution chlorine analysis in December 2022.  A Tier 3 Public Notice is attached to this report. Our laboratory reported a lead and copper result late last year.  The report was submitted and compliance was achieved There were no other violations in 2022.

3930-FM-BSDW0196b    7/2020                                 COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

Form                                                                DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

                              BUREAU OF SAFE DRINKING WATER

TIER 3 PUBLIC NOTICE

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER FAILURE TO MONITOR

 

ESTE INFORME CONTIENE INFORMACIÓN IMPORTANTE ACERCA DE SU AGUA POTABLE.  HAGA QUE ALGUIEN LO TRADUZCA PARA USTED, O HABLE CON ALGUIEN QUE LO ENTIENDA.

 

                                         Monitoring Requirements Not Met for Freemansburg MHP                      

 

Our water system violated several drinking water standards over the past year.  Even though these were not emergencies, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened and what we did to correct these situations.

We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis.  Results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not our drinking water meets health standards.  During 2022 we failed to monitor for the following analyte and therefore cannot be sure of the quality of our drinking water during that time.

 

What should I do?

There is nothing you need to do at this time.

The table below lists the analyte(s) we did not properly test for during the last year, the required sampling frequency, how many samples we took, when samples should have been taken, and the date on which corrective action samples were (or will be) taken.

Analyte Required sampling frequency Number of samples taken When all samples should have been taken When samples were or will be taken
Chlorine Weekly 0 10/30/22-11/05/22 11/09/22

 

What happened?  What was done? When will it be resolved?

The weekly distribution system chlorine result was not recorded (violation ID #02569). Chlorine testing was performed daily at the entry point during that week and results were above the required minimum. Weekly distribution results during the prior and following weeks were likewise within normal parameters.

 

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).  You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

For more information regarding this notice, please contact Kenneth Fulford               at (610) 216-0150                       .

Certified by:

 

Signature:                                                                                                                             Date: 05/12/23                 

 

Print Name and Title:  Kenneth L. Fulford – Operator, General Manager, K. L. Fulford Associates, Inc.                          

 

As a representative of the Public Water system indicated above, I certify that public notification addressing the above violation was distributed to all customers in accordance with the delivery requirements outlined in Chapter 25 PA Code 109 Subchapter D of the Department of Environmental

Protection (DEP’s) regulations.  The following methods of distribution were used: Notice Distributed with Annual Consumer Confidence Report

 

PWS ID#:  3480012                                                                                                                                                Date distributed:                             

 

CONSERVE

Westwood Villa

PWS ID 1713001

Annual Consumer Drinking Water

Quality Report 2023

WATER’                     Year 2022 Monitoring Data

 

We at Sweetwater Environmental Management, LLC are pleased to present a water quality summary of the drinking water provided to you during the past year. The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) requires that public water systems issue an annual “Consumer Confidence Report” to customers in addition to other notices that may be required by law. This report details where your water comes from, what it contains, and the potential risks your water contains, and the treatment designed to prevent contamination.

Westwood Villa is commited to providing you with a safe and reliable water supply. Informed consumers are our best allies in maintaining safe drinking water.

We are proud to report that the water provided by Westwood Villa meets current established waterquality standards listed in this report. Sincerely,

Frederick J. Gross, REM • CEA

President,

Sweewvater Environmental Management, LLC

More information is available from:

Sweetwater Environmental

Management, LLC

Phone (856) 205-1999

OR

Westwood Villa

Phone (856) 694-3232

Vulnerable Population:

Water Source:

Wesuood Villa is a privately owned water system, no public meetings are scheduled at this time, for more information please call the numbers listed above.

The water system is an independent potable water system with no interconnections to any other potable water system.

The New Jersey Department of Environmental

Protection (NJDEP) is preparing Source Water Assessment Reports and Summaries for all public water systems, was completed and issued. A summary for our system is attached (Attachment 1); additional information on the Source Water Assessment Program can be obtained by logging onto NJDEP’s source water assessment web site at ymw.state.ni.us/dep/swap or by contacting NJDEP’s Bureau of Safe Drinking Water at (609) 292-5550. You may also contact your public water system at (856) 694-3232.

The dinking water is supplied by groundwater source, pumped from one of two wells on site in Salem County.

Well Data Table:

ell Name 1 back-uo 3 suoolv
Well Depth (Feet) 180 160
Pump Capacity (GPM) 7.5 45
Aauifer Name Cohansev Cohansev
Treatment Ion Exchanae ton Exchange

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800426-4791

  Water Quali Table:            
  Contaminant Violation YIN Sample Date Level

Detected

Range Units MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination  
  Inor anic Contaminants:            
  Fluoride   02/24/21 0.23 Single

Sample

ppm 4 4 Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories  
  Secondary

Contaminant

Sample Date Level

Detected

Units RUL Likely Source of Contamination  
  Iron 02/24/21 114 ppb 300 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits  
  Sodium 02/24/21 39 ppm 50 Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage  
Physical/Chem

Characteristics

Sample Date Level

Detected

Units RUL   Physical/Chem

Characteristics

Sample Date Level

Detected

Units RUL
Total Dissolved Solids 03/11/21 159 ppm 500 Chloride 02/24/21 2.3 ppm 250

Definitions:

In the above table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we’ve provided the following definitions:

PPM Parts per million or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part per million corresponds to one minute in Wyo years or a single penny in $10,000.

PPB Parts per billion or Micrograms per liter – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a

single penny in $10,000,000.

pCi/L Picocuries per liter – picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

AL Action Level – the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

MCL Maximum Contaminant Level – Is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLGMaximum Contaminant Level Goal – Is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Secondary Contaminant- Substances that do not have an impact on health. Secondary Contaminants affect aesthetic qualities such as odor, taste or appearance. Secondary standards are recommendations, not mandates.

RUL Recommended Upper Limit— Recommended maximum concentration of secondary contaminants. These reflect aesthetic qualities such as odor, taste or appearance. RUL’s are recommendations, not mandates.

The Safe Drinking Water Act regulations allow monitoring waivers to reduce or eliminate the monitoring requirements for asbestos, volatile organic chemicals and synthetic organic chemicals. Our system received monitoring waivers for all of these types of contaminants. Most data in the CCR will be from 2018, however, if the system has monitoring waivers, or for another reason monitors less than once per year, the system must use the most recent data. The state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, are more than one year old.

Potential Health Effects of Detected Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants:

Copper. Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson’s Disease should consult their personal doctor.

Fluoride. Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children may get mottled teeth.

Secondary Contaminants:

Sodium. For healthy individuals the sodium intake from water is not important, because a much greater intake of sodium takes place from salt in the diet. However sodium levels above the Recommended Upper Limit (RUL) may be of concern to individuals on a sodium restricted diet.

What Does This Mean?

We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some contaminants have been detected. As you can see by the table, our system had no violations. We will continue to monitor to meet or exceeds the water quality standards.

Additional Health Information:

To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, Environmental Protection Agency prescribes limits on the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants jn bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (1-800-426-4791 ).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the groundl it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife,
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas projection, mining, or farming.

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.

  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can, also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Special Considerations Regarding Children, Pregnant Women, Nursing Mothers, and Others:

Children may receive a slightly higher amount of a contaminant present in the water than do adults, on a body weight basis, because they may drink a greater amount of water per pound of body weight than do adults. For this reason» reproductive or developmental effects are used for calculating a drinking water standard if these effects occur at lower levels than other health effects of concern. If there is insufficient toxicity information for a chemical (for example, lack of data on reproductive or developmental effects), an extra uncertainty factor may be incorporated into the calculation of the drinking water standard, thus making the standard more stringent, to account for additional uncertainties regarding these effects. In the cases of lead and nitrate, effects on infants and children are the health endpoints upon which the standards are based.

Nitrate Health Information:

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

Lead Health Information:

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Westwood Villa is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in water is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/safewaternead”

Why save water and how to avoid wasting it?

Although out system has adequate amount of water to meet present and future demands, there are a number of reasons why it is important to conserve water:

  • Saving water saves energy and some of the costs associated with both of these necessities of life:
  • Saving water reduces the cost of energy required to pump water and the need to construct costly new wells, pumping systems and water towers; and
  • Saving water lessens the strain on the water system during a dry spell or drought, helping to avoid severe water use restrictions so that essential firefighting needs are met.

You can play a role in conserving water by becoming conscious of the amount of water your household is using, and by looking for ways to use less whenever you can. It is not hard to conserve water. Conservation tips include:

Automatic dishwashers use 15 gallons for every cycle, regardless of how many dishes are loaded. So get a run for your money and load it to capacity.

  • Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth.
  • Check every faucet in your home for leaks. Just a slow drip can waste 15 to 20 gallons a day. Fix it up and you can save almost 6,000 gallons per year.
  • Check your toilets for leaks by putting a few drops of food coloring in the tank, watch for a few minutes to see if the color shows up in the bowl. It is not uncommon to lose up to 100 gallons a day from one of these otherwise invisible toilet leaks. Fix and you save more than 30,000 gallons a year.

Handy’s Mobile Home Park- PWSID # 1713001

Handy’s Mobile Home Park is a public community water system consisting of 3 well(s), 0 wells under the influence of surface water, 0 surface water intake(s), 0 purchased ground water source(s), and 0 purchased surface water source(s).

This system’s source water comes from the following aquifer(s) and/or surface water body(s) (if applicable): upper Potomac-RaritanMagothy aquifer

This system purchases water from the following water system(s) (if applicable):

Susceptibility Ratinqs for Handy’s Mobile Home Park Sources

The table below illustrates the susceptibility ratings for the seven contaminant categories (and radon) for each source in the system. The table provides the number of wells and intakes that rated high medium (M), or low (L) for each contaminant category. For susceptibility ratings of purchased waters refer to the specific water system’s source water assessment report.

The seven contaminant categories are defined at the bottom of this page. DEP considered all surface water highly susceptible to pathogens, therefore all intakes received a high rating for the pathogen category. For the purpose of Source Water Assessment Program, radionuclides are more of a concem for ground water than surface water. As a result, surface water intakes’ susceptibility to radionuclides was not determined and they all received a low rating.

If a system is rated highly susceptible for a contaminant category, it does not mean a customer is or will be consuming contaminated drinking water. The rating reflects the potential for contamination of source water, not the existence of contamination. Public water systems are required to monitor for regulated contaminants and to install treatment if any contaminants are detected at frequencies and concentrations above allowable levels. As a result of the assessments, DEP may customize (change existing) monitoring schedules based on the susceptibility ratings.

  Pathogens Nutrients Pesticides Volatile

Organic

Compounds

Inorganics Radionuclides Radon Disinfection

Byproduct

Precursors

Sources                                                
Wells -3     3     3     3                              
GUDI -O                                                
Surface water intakes – O                                                

Pathogens: Disease-causing organisms such as bacteria and viruses. Common sources are animal and human fecal wastes.  Nutrients: Compounds, minerals and elements that aid growth, that are both naturally occurring and man-made. Examples include nitrogen and phosphorus.

  • Volatile Organic Compounds: Man-made chemicals used as solvents, degreasers, and gasoline components. Examples include benzene, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and vinyl chloride.
  • Pesticides: Man-made chemicals used to control pests, weeds and fungus. Common sources include land application and manufacturing centers of pesticides. Examples include herbicides such as atrazine, and insecticides such as chlordane.

Inorganics: Mineral-based compounds that are both naturally occurring and man-made. Examples include arsenic, asbestos, copper, lead, and nitrate.

  • Radionuclides: Radioactive substances that are both naturally occurring and man-made. Examples include radium and uranium. Radon: Colorless, odorless, cancer-causing gas that occurs naturally in the environment. For more information go to ‘//www.ni.qov/dep/rppfradonfindex.htm or call (800) 648-0394.
  • Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: A common source is naturally occurring organic matter in surface water. Disinfection byproducts are formed when the disinfectants (usually chlorine) used to kill pathogens react with dissolved organic material (for example leaves) present in surface water.

3

2022 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

Barton Court MHC

Bartonsville, PA

PWSID# 2450005

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su agua potable. Tradúzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien.

We’re pleased to present to you our Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for water quality in 2022. This report is designed to inform you about the quality of water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water is drawn from two groundwater wells. These wells are located on the park property. Our water is presently disinfected with chlorine. Water from our wells is tested on a regular basis. We monitor the surrounding watershed area to ensure that our wells do not become contaminated. The water system is operated by a state Certified Water Plant Operator (Mr. Craig LaBarre).

I’m pleased to report that our drinking water meets federal and state requirements

This report shows our water quality and what it means. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact bartoncourt@arxmanagement.com, at 833-968-7279. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.

Barton Court MHC routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2022. Some of the water samples were actually collected prior to 2022 but are the most recent data, which is available. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, maybe reasonably expected to contain at least a small amount of some contaminants. It’s important to remember that the presence of these contaminants does not necessarily pose a health risk. This table lists all of the tests, which we performed which had detectable levels, violations of an MCL or AL, or are of particular interest (see the following list for definition of MCL and AL). The following is a list of all the testing which has been performed: Total Coliform Bacteria, Inorganic Chemicals (14 elements), Volatile Organic Chemicals (21 compounds), Gross Alpha Activity, Nitrates, Nitrites, Lead, Copper, TTHM, and HAAS.

In this table, you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we’ve provided the following definitions:

Definitions:

Non-Detects (ND) — laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present at a detectable level.

Parts per million (PPM) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) — one per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $ 10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter — one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years or a single penny in S 10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) — picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Action Level (AL) — the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT) — A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) — The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal — The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) — the highest level of disinfectant allowed in drinking water.

There is convincing evidence that the addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) — The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

TEST RESULTS

Microbiological Contaminants

Contaminant

Unit of measurement

Level

Detected

MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Total Coliform Bacteria Absent o Presence of Coliform bacteria in 5% of monthly sam les Naturally present environment in the

Inorganic Contaminants

Contaminant unit of measurement Level

Detected

MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Copper (ppm) 0.213 1.3 AL=1.3 Corrosion of household plumbing system; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives
Lead (ppb) o AL=15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Nitrate (as Nitrogen)

(ppm)

Location 101

Location 102

1.62 10 10 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural de sits

Radioactive Contaminants

Contaminant unit of measurement Level

Detected

MCLG MCL Likely Source of Contamination
Combined radium 226 CVI 5 Erosion of natural deposits
Combined radium

228

(pCi/1)

5 Erosion of natural deposits

Disinfectants

Disinfectant

(Unit of measurement)

Lowest

Level

Detected

Range MRLG MRDL Likely Source of

Contamination

Chlorine (ppm) Location 101 0.58 0.581.23 4 4 Water additive to control microbes

Definitions:

Total Coliform: Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially — harmful, bacteria may be present. If Coliforms are found in more samples than allowed it would indicate that potential problems may exist.

Fecal coliform/E. Coli: Fecal coliforms and E. Coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems. Radioactive Contaminants:

Beta/photon emitters: Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta and photon emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer. Alpha emitters: Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Combined Radium 226/228: Some people who drink water containing radium 226 or 228 in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson’s disease should consult their personal doctor.

Lead: Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure.

Nitrate.: Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.

Barium: Some people who drink water containing barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their blood pressure.

Nitrite: Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrite in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.

TTHMs/Total Trihalomethanes: Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Arsenic: Some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Dichloromethane: Some people who drink water containing dichloromethane in excess of the MCL over many years could have liver problems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

What does this mean?

The table shows that our system passes all of the water quality standards. We have listed below additional information, which we feel may be of value to you.

Total Coliform: Water quality testing for Total Coliform bacteria was performed during this period and test results indicated the water passes the Total Coliform Standards for Drinking Water. Total Coliform bacteria are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present. Fecal coliforms and E. Coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

The Total Coliform Rule requires water systems to meet a stricter limit for coliform bacteria Coliform bacteria are usually harmless, but their presence in water can be an indication of disease-causing bacteria. When coliform bacteria are found, special follow-up tests are done to determine if harmful bacteria are present in the water supply. If this limit is exceeded, the water supplier must notify the public by newspaper, television, or radio. To comply with the stricter regulation, we have increased the average amount of chlorine in the distribution system. Lead: Water samples were collected in 2022. Infants and children who drink water, which contains lead in excess of the action level, could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink water, which contains Lead over many years, could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. Corrosive water leaches Lead and/or Copper into the water supply from the plumbing in your houses. We recommend that all consumers flush the water tap for a few minutes prior to drinking the water. ms technique is recommended only if the water has been standing still in the pipes for several hours. Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791

Nitrates: Our water supply was tested for nitrates and test results indicate the levels to be far below the MCL for drinking water. As a precaution, we always notify physicians and health care providers in this area if there is ever a higher-than-normal level of nitrates in the water supply.

Educational Information

All sources of drinking water is subject to potential contamination by naturally occurring or man-made pollutants. Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4191.

MCLs are set at very stringent levels for health effects. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their healthcare providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791).

Total Coliform bacteria are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present. Fecal coliforms and E. Coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in this waste can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

Infants and children who drink water, which contains lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. Corrosive water leaches Lead and/or Copper into the water supply from the plumbing in your houses. Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested. We also recommend flushing your tap for 20 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water. Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Lead in drinking water is rarely the sole cause of lead poisoning, but it can add to a person’s total lead exposure. All potential sources of lead in the household should be identified and removed, replaced, or reduced.

Some people who drink water containing Dichloromethane in excess of the MCL over many years could have liver problems and many have an increased risk of getting cancer.

EPA has revised the drinking water standard for Arsenic. New regulations are in effect as of January 1, 2008. Arsenic is a naturally occurring mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations.

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than

Six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask for advice from your healthcare provider.

In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, it may be necessary to make improvements to your water system. Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. Please call our office if you have questions.

We at Barton Court MHC work around the clock to provide top-quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life, and our children’s future.